Archive for April, 2014

Let Your Love Grow

April 25, 2014

“What we have once enjoyed we can never lose.  All that we love deeply becomes a part of us.”  Helen Keller

Your beloved pet has passed away, you chose a private cremation so you have your pet’s ashes and you are wondering what to do next. How do you memorialize such a special relationship? There are so many options and decisions to make and your mind is so overwhelmed with the grieving of your loss, it is difficult to know what to do.

“Let Your Love Grow” is a relatively new option that many people are unaware of when  making decisions about memorializing of their pet.  “Let Your Love Grow” provides the opportunity to have a living memorial of your pet, by using the cremated ashes of a loved one to nourish the plant.  A common misconception is that cremated ashes can be used by themselves in the ground, under or around  a new or existing plant or tree, and that the ashes will help the plants grow.  On the contrary, the cremated ashes on their own will not allow for the release of the nutrients which as in the pet’s ashes.  Instead of nurturing plants, the untreated ashes will actually harm surrounding plant life.  The high pH of cremated ash does not allow nutrients to become available for plant life; additionally, the high sodium (salt) content of cremated ash can harm plant life.  “Let Your Love Grow” is a specially formulated organic mixture that lowers the pH and dilutes the harmful sodium (salt), as well as releases the nutrients from the cremated ashes. Regular soil and potting soil will not do this.  Using “Let Your Love Grow” is the answer to creating a living memorial.

Creating a living memorial is actually a very simple process.  Here are the steps:

1. Select a plant appropriate for your climate and situation.

2. Mix the appropriate amount of cremated ashes with “Let Your Love Grow” (we at Rolling Acres will help you with this; both the amounts and mixing, if you desire.)

3. Plant this mixture along with your chosen plant.

4. Water in abundance to keep plants healthy.

In the grief process, many of us want to have something we can touch and see to remind us of the one who is no longer here and keep them close to us of the one who is no longer here and keep them close to us. Nothing could ever replace that life; however, selecting a plant or tree for your home or garden is a wonderful way to cherish and celebrate the special bond you have with your pet. A plant or tree is a living memorial – a way to express love that has not ended with death. the circle of life is continued when nourished by “Let Your Love Grow” and the cremated ashes.  Something extraordinary truly happens as it becomes a living symbol of the special life you shared.

 

http://vimeo.com/45867018

Let Your Love Grow

 

 

Count Your Blessings

April 19, 2014

ImageA friend of mine lost her best friend last week.  Her furry friend passed away due to old age.  He had been her constant companion for a decade,  helping her through many trials.  My friend, you see, is confined to a wheelchair.  Most of us love the pets in our lives, and they are  often considered family members.  To someone like my friend, Sammy, her beloved pet was also her support dog.  Her lifeline if you will.  Sammy has been counting her blessings in recent days.  Instead of having a pity party, she decided to count her blessings.  She states, “each day is your birthday” when you open your eyes and realize you have been gifted another day.  Sammy has coined the phrase “anti-pity party” or “Sammy-isms.”  She truly believes in the words of Willie Nelson, “when I started counting my blessings, my whole life turned around for the better.”  To join Sammy in her mission takes only a few simple steps:

Sammy-ism #1 – Be glad for family and friends, cherish them

Sammy-ism #2 – Be thankful for what you have, not what you don’t have

Sammy-ism #3 – Don’t let technology take the place of personal interactions

Sammy-ism #4 – Savor good health, it is one thing that can be fleeting

Sammy-ism #5 – Take responsibility for your education, a mind is a terrible thing to waste

Sammy-ism #6 – Be thankful for coworkers, being part of team makes a job easier

Sammy-ism #7 – Praise people when they do something good, don’t just comment on things they do wrong

Sammy-ism #8 – Accept a compliment gracefully, it is a gift of kindness from the giver

Sammy-ism #9 – We can all learn from each other, the load is lighter when shared

Sammy-ism #10 – Nothing lasts forever, cherish each moment with loved ones

Pocket Pets – Good things come in small packages

April 5, 2014

There is an old saying – “good things come in small packages.”  I guess the same can be said for our companion animals.  Most people think of companion animals as dogs, cats, horses, rabbits, guinea pigs, miniatures horses, pot belly pigs and birds.  There are a growing number of people who also think of rats, mice, lizards, sugar gliders, hamsters, fish and turtles as companion animals.  Who is to judge what others see in these animals as pets? 

I had a pet duckling when growing up.  That little duckling followed me everywhere.  I called her “darling.”  One day I found “darling” on the ground, torn apart by Lord knows what !!  I was devastated to say the least.  My mom was understanding and scooped her up, wrapped her in a towel and took her to the vet.  The vet was very kind and compassionate and offered information on afterlife care, as she knew how much “darling” had meant to me.  We decided to bury her in our backyard.  However, this is not an option for those who live in an apartment, or some other places in the city due to ordinances. 

I wrote a poem and we had a little memorial service with friends and family for little “darling,” but it was really more for me to say good-bye to my pet duckling.  It is one of the best gifts my mom could have provided for me.  I learned how to grieve at a young age and also how to take care of the steps when a pet passes away.  Eight years old is not too young to understand death and grieving.  I believe that having this life experience at a young age helped mold me into a more compassionate adult.  If you have an experience you would like to share, we invite you to comment on our blog, or send your comments or story to our contact page.Image