Posts Tagged ‘dogs’

Pet Memorial Day – September 14, 2014

September 26, 2014

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It was a beautiful day with blue skies and a gentle breeze caressing our faces.  There were so many folks in attendance; we brought out extra chairs for those who wanted to sit during the ceremony and blessing of the animals.  We thank our many friends who were able to attend and for those who could not be there, we were with you in Spirit and Prayer.  Although, National Pet Memorial Day was held at Rolling Acres Memorial Gardens and other special events across the country on September 14, 2014, we can memorialize our pets any day of the year.  Creating a special memorial for your pet can be as simple or elaborate as you desire.  It is personal preference and what ever is meaningful to you.  Included are a few suggestions, should you desire to create your own personalized memorial for your beloved pet.  Anything you decide to do should meet your special need to express your sorrow over your loss and share your feelings while paying a tribute to the special bond you share with your pet.

If you like to write, create a special poem or story about your pet. It can be in the form of an article, song, letter, obituary or eulogy sharing your feelings about saying goodbye to your special pet.

Share verbal stories and let others know it is okay to talk about their feelings about your pet.  It is better to keep the memories alive rather than act as though nothing has changed.

Place a small clipping of fur, feather, or teeth in a small container or locket.

If your pet had a special skill or competed in events, create a memory book, shadow box, or make a wall hanging from the ribbons.  Some people make quilts or pillows from the ribbon fabric from the pet’s winning competitions.

Decorate a candle or candle holder and light it in memory of your beloved pet.

Write his or her name on a balloon and release the balloon.

Donate a  book to the a local library in honor of your pet.  Please the pet’s name on the bookplate inside the front cover of the book.

Children need to express their grief also.  Create an art corner where they can draw pictures, write stories, or just talk about their memories of their pet.

Have a professional artist create a painting of your pet from a favorite photo.

Have items imprinted (watch, mug, notepads, t-shirt, etc.) with your pet’s photo.

Purchase a stuffed animal or statue that resembles your pet and put your pet’s collar around its neck.

There are many ways to memorialize your pet.  Check out these webpages for more ideas.

http://www.visitrollingacres.com

http://www.lovinghearts.com

http://www.pet-loss.net

http://www.dogtime.com

http://www.vetstreet.com

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Caring for the Homeless and Their Pets – Need Food Now

July 25, 2014

Rich

What could be more unfortunate than for someone to lose everything, but their beloved pet, and find themselves in need of help to keep their companion animal, often the only family they have left?  Pets provide comfort and companionship to the homeless.  Many homeless situations are temporary and the family is in need of help in the short-term in order to keep their pet(s).

Rolling Acres Memorial Gardens is proud to support the Uplift Organization where their main goal is to assist the homeless, including their pets.  Rolling Acres Memorial Gardens for Pets seeks donations of pet food, toys, leashes, collars, blankets, towels and pet beds.  If your pet has outgrown a collar or leash, has a diet change and you have an open bag of pet food you won’t use, or one your pet doesn’t like; just tape up the open bag and bring it to Rolling Acres.  Your donations will be distributed to the homeless in the community.

Our volunteer coordinator from Uplift Organization says their shelves are overflowing in December.  She wishes people would recognize the need throughout the year, especially during the months of June, July and August as the need is just as great in the summer as it is in December.  The shelves are currently almost bare.  We need food NOW !!!!

In September 2001, Rolling Acres Memorial Gardens for Pets started soliciting contributions for homeless people’s pets, either pet food or money for pet food.  This was after it came to Nancy Piper’s attention that many homeless people also have pets.  Some of their concerns are food for their pets, veterinary care, and the afterlife care of their pets – the same as ours!  Collectible items such as blankets, towels, and clothing is needed, as well as pet food. If you have anything to donate, just bring it to Rolling Acres and we will deliver it for you.  In 2013, with the generous and overwhelming assistance of the community, Rolling Acres Memorial Gardens for Pets provided 6,112 pounds of dry pet food, 391 cans of canned pet food, cat and dog treats, as well as pet beds, pet carriers, toys, collars, leashes, pet brushes, and combs to Homeless Peoples’ Pets.  The need for this support has been increasing in recent months.  Rolling Acres thanks the public for their help in this year-round project.  Uplift Organization is the primary benefactor of the pet food and supplies.  We also supply the Red Cross with pet food.

Choices and Options for the Final Responsibility

June 20, 2014

HealingWe have choices and options available to us when the time comes for our Final Responsibility to our loved ones.  Believe it or not, there are choices of firms that will provide services for the afterlife care of your pet.  You do have the right to request burial and  either private or communal cremation.  These are topics most people do not like to think about until the time comes, however, it is worth the time to plan ahead.  It is your final responsibility to your beloved pet.

Don’t be afraid to ask questions, lots of questions.  Ask enough questions so that you can rest assured you are going to get exactly what you want when the time comes.  Ask a veterinarian, search the Internet, or look in the yellow pages for Pet Cemeteries and/or Crematories.  Why shouldn’t we have rituals for our deceased pets?  The pet parent has the right to plan a visitation, memorial service, or funeral service specially designed for them.  Discussing this before and making selections of services and/or urns helps us feel some sense of control in a situation where we feel a great loss of control in loosing a loved one.

Many people, in fact, most people leave their pet’s body at the veterinarian’s office.  They experience a lot of stress and grief wondering about what happened to the body.  Some people do not want to ask, as they are afraid of the answer.  None of us want our loved ones to die, but we all realize it is inevitable.  Most people are not aware there are options in caring for the deceased pet’s body in a respectful and dignified manner.

The best time to start is early on in your pet’s life.  Feel free to go and visit a facility to see if you like the people that work there and are comfortable with them handling the final arrangements for your best friend and beloved companion.  It is best to investigate before you actually need the services and are in an emotional state of mind.  Most people feel better and enjoy their pets even more knowing they are prepared and have trust in the facility and people who will care for their pet in their time of greatest need.  Making a prearrangement plan helps alleviate some of the stress of experiencing the grief of the loss of a loved one.  With a plan in place, all one needs to do while grieving and hurting is make a phone call, knowing their treasured companion will be handled according to their wishes.  The promise of handling their pet during this time with compassion, dignity and respect helps ease the pain of the loss.

Summer time and the living is easy? Not inside your vehicle – for your pets.

June 3, 2014

Looks can be deceiving.  On the outside on a 70 degree day, the inside of a vehicle can heat to over 100 degrees in just a few minutes.  In a very short time, a pet left in a vehicle on a warm day can succumb to heatstroke and/or suffocation and die.  Even in the shade, on a 78 degree day, temperatures in a car parked in the shade can exceed 90 degrees – and rise to a scalding 160 degrees in the sun!  Even with windows cracked open a bit.  A common misnomer by many people is that their pet will be safe with the windows cracked open.  Never leave pets or children in parked cars even for short periods of time, even if the temperatures are in the 60s and even higher.  Rolling down windows and parking in the shade will not guarantee safety or protection, since temperatures can quickly climb into the danger zone.

Many people ask about leaving the dog in the car with the air-conditioning running?  This is still extremely hazardous.  For example, in 2003, a police dog in Texas died after the air conditioning in the patrol car shut down and began blowing hot air.  The air system’s compressor had kicked off because the engine got too hot.  Newer model automobiles have computerized functions, and are prone to the same problem.  In less than 30 minutes, a North Carolina couple lost two of their beloved dogs, and nearly lost a third, as a result of a similar vehicular failure in the hot August sun.

In many states it is against the law to leave a dog in a car after the temperature reaches a certain point.  Owners and pet sitters can be held legally accountable and pay fines or be incarcerated for neglect and abuse of their pet, even in the most innocent of situations when a dog is left in the car for even a few minutes.  More recently a pet sitter/dog walker is under prosecution after six pets left in her care were left in a vehicle and died due to heat exhaustion after being left in the vehicle. 

Dogs are not able to sweat like humans.  Cats and dogs cool themselves by panting and by sweating through their paws.  They can go into duress and collapse, suffer organ failure, brain damage and potentially die of heatstroke.  In just 15 minutes, an animal’s body temperature can rise from a normal temperature to one of deadly levels that will damage the nervous and cardiovascular systems, often leaving the animal comatose, dehydrated and at risk of permanent impairment or death.

What should you do if you see an animal or child in a car on a hot day?

  • Take down the car’s color, model, make, and license plate number.
  • Have the owner paged in the store and call animal control/police.
  • Have someone keep an eye on the animal, or child.
  • Don’t leave the scene until the situation has resolved.  If police are unresponsive or too slow and the dog’s life appears to be in imminent danger, find a witness (or several) who will back up your assessment, take steps to remove the suffering animal, and then wait for authorities to arrive.

THIS IS a tragedy that is PREVENTABLE – if you truly love your pets – LEAVE THEM HOME

Leaving an animal in a vehicle on a warm day is like placing them in a furnace. 

At highest risk are puppies to 6 months of age; older large breeds 7 years and above, small breeds 14 and above, dogs with short muzzles/snouts with a wide heat; ill-overweight-over exerted; black or thick coats; dehydrated; or any existing medical conditions.

DANGER SIGNS:

If you think your companion is suffering from heatstroke, immediately remove him or her to a cool, shady place.  Try to slowly lower the animal’s temperature by placing in cool, not cold water; apply ice to the head and neck area; GET TO A VETERINARIAN AS SOON AS POSSIBLE AS FOLLOW-UP CARE IS CRITICAL TO HIS WELL BEING. 

LOOK FOR: rapid panting, bright red tongue, red or place gums, thick, sticky saliva; depression; weak/dizzy; vomiting/diarrhea; shock; coma.

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Creating Memories

February 15, 2014

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Every moment of every day presents the opportunity to make and preserve a special memory.  Once that moment has passed, it cannot be regained, however, the possibility of reliving that memory is real.  Each unique life provides special times of sharing.  We invite you to join us at Rolling Acres Memorial Gardens on March 15, 2014 for an enjoyable time of sharing and creating Keepsake Memory Books together.  We will provide all of the supplies for you to create a wonderful keepsake.  All you need to bring is your memories and photos or special items to place in your memory book.

Even if you do not consider yourself a creative or crafty person, you will enjoy this time of sharing and fellowship.  You can sign up through facebook in the events section or RSVP by calling 816-891-8888.  You can also email us at rollingacresinfo@gmail.com to reserve your spot.  You can even just drop in, we will have enough supplies for anyone who wants to stop by at the last minute.

Date:  March 15, 2014

Time: 3pm-5pm

Location:  Rolling Acres Memorial Gardens, 12200 N. Crooked Road, Kansas City, MO  64152

We look forward to seeing you.

Happy Valentines

February 11, 2014

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We cannot change the whole world, but we can change someone’s world.  Our mission is to serve those who think of their pet as one of the family by providing compassionate, dignified and ethical after life care for your pet.  Each life we touch through caring for your pets blesses us.  Through our services we strive to create a better world for you and your pet as you journey through the stages of life together.  We are here in your time of greatest need in providing afterlife care for your beloved pet(s).

V – Value – We VALUE you

A – Appreciate – We APPRECIATE your business

L – Love – We LOVE your pets as our own

E – Enjoy – We ENJOY helping people

N – Necessary – We CARE about the necessary grief and healing process

T – Time – We take the TIME to get things right

I – Interest – We are always INTERESTED in the human animal bond

N – Notice – We NOTICE every detail

E – End – We are there to help others to the END of life and beyond

Valentine Day