Posts Tagged ‘funeral’

Choices and Options for the Final Responsibility

June 20, 2014

HealingWe have choices and options available to us when the time comes for our Final Responsibility to our loved ones.  Believe it or not, there are choices of firms that will provide services for the afterlife care of your pet.  You do have the right to request burial and  either private or communal cremation.  These are topics most people do not like to think about until the time comes, however, it is worth the time to plan ahead.  It is your final responsibility to your beloved pet.

Don’t be afraid to ask questions, lots of questions.  Ask enough questions so that you can rest assured you are going to get exactly what you want when the time comes.  Ask a veterinarian, search the Internet, or look in the yellow pages for Pet Cemeteries and/or Crematories.  Why shouldn’t we have rituals for our deceased pets?  The pet parent has the right to plan a visitation, memorial service, or funeral service specially designed for them.  Discussing this before and making selections of services and/or urns helps us feel some sense of control in a situation where we feel a great loss of control in loosing a loved one.

Many people, in fact, most people leave their pet’s body at the veterinarian’s office.  They experience a lot of stress and grief wondering about what happened to the body.  Some people do not want to ask, as they are afraid of the answer.  None of us want our loved ones to die, but we all realize it is inevitable.  Most people are not aware there are options in caring for the deceased pet’s body in a respectful and dignified manner.

The best time to start is early on in your pet’s life.  Feel free to go and visit a facility to see if you like the people that work there and are comfortable with them handling the final arrangements for your best friend and beloved companion.  It is best to investigate before you actually need the services and are in an emotional state of mind.  Most people feel better and enjoy their pets even more knowing they are prepared and have trust in the facility and people who will care for their pet in their time of greatest need.  Making a prearrangement plan helps alleviate some of the stress of experiencing the grief of the loss of a loved one.  With a plan in place, all one needs to do while grieving and hurting is make a phone call, knowing their treasured companion will be handled according to their wishes.  The promise of handling their pet during this time with compassion, dignity and respect helps ease the pain of the loss.

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Memorial Day – Memories from beginning to middle to end –

May 17, 2014

 

Eternal Memory

Most people when they add a pet to their family often only think about the exciting beginning.  They look forward to many years of companionship (the middle), but rarely consider the last days of their pet’s life with them.  As we share our life journey with our pets, there are ten tips to consider for the end stages of life with our beloved pets.

1.  How will you know when it is time to euthanize your pet?

2.  Should you stay during the euthanasia?

3.  What are your next steps?

4.  You may ask yourself, “do others feel as emotionally distressed as I do, or am I overreacting?”

5.  What can you expect to feel?

6.  What can you do about your feelings?

7.  Who can you talk with about your feelings?

8.  What should you tell the children (if you have any)?

9.  What if you notice your other pets acting in a strange manner?

10. Should you get another pet right away?

These questions and more information can be found on the Rolling Acres Memorial Gardens website:   http://www.visitrollingacres.com/faqs.html

Feel free to call any time to discuss any of these questions, or other questions you may have.

This is a very challenging time in your life journey with your pet.  Rolling Acres Memorial Gardens is here to help you during this time in the life of you and your pet.

We invite you to visit Rolling Acres Memorial Gardens at any time.

M – Making

E – Every

M – Moment an

O – Opportunity to

R – Reflect  on

Y – Yesterdays

Let Your Love Grow

April 25, 2014

“What we have once enjoyed we can never lose.  All that we love deeply becomes a part of us.”  Helen Keller

Your beloved pet has passed away, you chose a private cremation so you have your pet’s ashes and you are wondering what to do next. How do you memorialize such a special relationship? There are so many options and decisions to make and your mind is so overwhelmed with the grieving of your loss, it is difficult to know what to do.

“Let Your Love Grow” is a relatively new option that many people are unaware of when  making decisions about memorializing of their pet.  “Let Your Love Grow” provides the opportunity to have a living memorial of your pet, by using the cremated ashes of a loved one to nourish the plant.  A common misconception is that cremated ashes can be used by themselves in the ground, under or around  a new or existing plant or tree, and that the ashes will help the plants grow.  On the contrary, the cremated ashes on their own will not allow for the release of the nutrients which as in the pet’s ashes.  Instead of nurturing plants, the untreated ashes will actually harm surrounding plant life.  The high pH of cremated ash does not allow nutrients to become available for plant life; additionally, the high sodium (salt) content of cremated ash can harm plant life.  “Let Your Love Grow” is a specially formulated organic mixture that lowers the pH and dilutes the harmful sodium (salt), as well as releases the nutrients from the cremated ashes. Regular soil and potting soil will not do this.  Using “Let Your Love Grow” is the answer to creating a living memorial.

Creating a living memorial is actually a very simple process.  Here are the steps:

1. Select a plant appropriate for your climate and situation.

2. Mix the appropriate amount of cremated ashes with “Let Your Love Grow” (we at Rolling Acres will help you with this; both the amounts and mixing, if you desire.)

3. Plant this mixture along with your chosen plant.

4. Water in abundance to keep plants healthy.

In the grief process, many of us want to have something we can touch and see to remind us of the one who is no longer here and keep them close to us of the one who is no longer here and keep them close to us. Nothing could ever replace that life; however, selecting a plant or tree for your home or garden is a wonderful way to cherish and celebrate the special bond you have with your pet. A plant or tree is a living memorial – a way to express love that has not ended with death. the circle of life is continued when nourished by “Let Your Love Grow” and the cremated ashes.  Something extraordinary truly happens as it becomes a living symbol of the special life you shared.

 

http://vimeo.com/45867018

Let Your Love Grow

 

 

Pocket Pets – Good things come in small packages

April 5, 2014

There is an old saying – “good things come in small packages.”  I guess the same can be said for our companion animals.  Most people think of companion animals as dogs, cats, horses, rabbits, guinea pigs, miniatures horses, pot belly pigs and birds.  There are a growing number of people who also think of rats, mice, lizards, sugar gliders, hamsters, fish and turtles as companion animals.  Who is to judge what others see in these animals as pets? 

I had a pet duckling when growing up.  That little duckling followed me everywhere.  I called her “darling.”  One day I found “darling” on the ground, torn apart by Lord knows what !!  I was devastated to say the least.  My mom was understanding and scooped her up, wrapped her in a towel and took her to the vet.  The vet was very kind and compassionate and offered information on afterlife care, as she knew how much “darling” had meant to me.  We decided to bury her in our backyard.  However, this is not an option for those who live in an apartment, or some other places in the city due to ordinances. 

I wrote a poem and we had a little memorial service with friends and family for little “darling,” but it was really more for me to say good-bye to my pet duckling.  It is one of the best gifts my mom could have provided for me.  I learned how to grieve at a young age and also how to take care of the steps when a pet passes away.  Eight years old is not too young to understand death and grieving.  I believe that having this life experience at a young age helped mold me into a more compassionate adult.  If you have an experience you would like to share, we invite you to comment on our blog, or send your comments or story to our contact page.Image